Syllabus

CVSP 207A LOVE

WHAT WILL YOU HAVE TO DO IN THIS COURSE?

  • READ ABOUT 30 PAGES PER CLASS MEETING, BEFORE THE DISCUSSION (WITH ONLINE READING QUIZZES ON BASIC FACTS OF THE READING), AND TAKE NOTES; IF YOU DON’T LIKE READING, THIS COURSE IS NOT FOR YOU
  • INTERPRETING AND MAKING ORIGINAL COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE AUTHORS USING YOUR OWN IDEAS
  • EXPERIMENT WITH DIGITAL TOOLS FOR TEXTUAL ANALYSIS
  • TWO VISUAL ESSAYS, TWO MIDTERMS AND ONE FINAL
  • REGULAR PARTICIPATION IN IN-CLASS DISCUSSION

COURSE POLICIES/PLAGIARISM

  • All phones should be set to silent at the beginning of the class. You can use your tablet or phone to take notes or look up information, but refrain from texting, answering your phone or allowing it to ring.
  • If you must leave class early, inform me, sit by the door and leave quietly.
  • If you know that you have to miss class, please inform the instructor ahead of time, and preferably in writing. Staying in communication is the key.
  • Students should bring their reading, notebook and pen/pencil to class or electronic device for taking notes. Students should have read the entirety of the assigned passages before class.
  • Tests and exams begin promptly on time.
  • Reading Quizzes must be taken online by the deadline. No makeups.
  • Excused absences must come from AUH bearing a barcode, and are subject to verification.
  • If you are caught cheating on quizzes or assignments, you will receive a ZERO for that assignment and your case will be reported to the Dean’s Committee on Academic Affairs (since my policy is very clear, the result will most likely be at least a Dean’s Warning in your record).

CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM:
YOU ARE IN UNIVERSITY NOW ! IT IS TIME TO LEARN HOW TO TAKE AN EXAM AND WRITE AN ACADEMIC PAPER WITH INTEGRITY. THIS MAY MEAN UNLEARNING CERTAIN HABITS ACQUIRED IN SCHOOL. MOST CASES OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY STEM OCCUR SINCE YOU ARE NOT WORKING AHEAD AND TAKING THE TIME TO FORMULATE YOUR IDEAS. IN THE CRUNCH FOR TIME; STUDENTS PRIORITIZE WRONG AND PASS OFF OTHERS’ IDEAS AS THEIR OWN.

WHAT COUNTS AS PLAGIARISM?

Any time you use another person’s ideas without giving him credit, you are guilty of plagiarism. The following, and other related activities would count as plagiarism:

  • Plagiarism is copying a whole paper, a paragraph, a sentence or phrase even visual material, from some other source, without citing that source, in a paper or in an exam. Taking a Wikipedia article as the basis of your paper and changing the words around with or without citation of the source is plagiarism. The case of the exams is a bit different. If you read an essay on the Internet in preparation for the exam and it gave you a specific idea which was not yours to begin with, then you should cite it. You can write, “In an essay by Joe Smith on Plato found at philosophy.com, I read…”
  • Talking about the readings is not plagiarism, but between talking and writing about a topic, there is a huge amount of effort required. Hearing a good idea and then writing it down without citing the origin is plagiarism.
  • Having someone write a paper for you is not plagiarism. It is cheating and it is forgery, and is a severe infraction of the student code of conduct.What counts as cheating?The AUB Policies and Procedures state: “While taking a test or examination, students shall rely on their own mastery of the subject and not attempt to receive help in any way not explicitly approved by the instructor; for example, students shall not try to use notes, study aids, or another’s work. Such cheating includes trying to give or obtain information about a test,1 I adapted this section on cheating and plagiarism from a similar sheet made by Prof. Richard Dean of the Philosophy Department at AUB.

trying to take someone else’s exam, or trying to have someone else take one’s own exam.”

Your instructor will consider any of the following as cheating and students found to be doing the following will receive an automatic zero, no questions asked.

  • Looking at another student’s paper during the test, even if you do not take anything from it. If you have a tendency to look around during tests, sit away from other students.
  • Using anything written before the test during the test. This would include cheat sheets, summary sheets, plagiarized essays, OR essays written for you by another which you memorize and write down when you come to the test.
  • Using your mobile phone during a test for any reason.
  • Talking to anyone–in any language and at any volume–during the tests,whether about the test or not. If you have a question, raise your hand and askme ONLY.
  • Showing your paper to other students during the tests. If you do not want torun the risk, sit away from people you suspect of looking at your paper.
  • Talking to other students between sections about the contents of an exam. What will happen if someone cheats or plagiarizes in this class?Nothing will happen to a cheater, as long as I don’t catch him/her. If I catch him/her, what will usually happen is that s/he’ll get a zero or will be reported to the Student Disciplinary Affairs Committee. If the cheating or plagiarism is very minor, the punishment may be less than that, but don’t count on anything less extreme than a zero on the assignment. By doing your own work and making some effort, you can always get a better grade than zero. Assess the risk of cheating, and accept the responsibilities for doing it.

AN IMPORTANT NOTE ON LANGUAGE:

LANGUAGE AND WRITTEN ENGLISH:

This is a not an English course, but it is a writing course. We will be doing reading for each and every class. You will also be writing. Mistakes in spelling and language may be corrected for your information, but you will not lose points for such mistakes. Nevertheless, your ability to organize the material, to focus your argument, and to demonstrate clarity of thought and expression in your written assignments will obviously be reflected in your grade. For in-class exams, if you feel uncomfortable about your written English, I would suggest writing in simple, clear, short sentences. Taking regular notes about your reading and while in class and then rewriting and reworking them in writing are good practice for the skill of written English.

LANGUAGE AND SPOKEN ENGLISH:

In class I would suggest that all students attempt to speak at least once each class period, even if your preparation of the material is not sufficient. The way that you learn to formulate ideas in spoken English is by trying them out in a class full of other students and with a teacher as your audience. When you hear a fellow student use a good expression, write it down and try to use it later.

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